Geography today is exploring and explaining the world we live in, by looking at the relationship between people and the environment.

The new geography national curriculum has been slimmed down but is based upon essential knowledge pupils need to acquire.

There is an increased emphasis on different regions and places around the world, understanding the importance of their location.

Renewed emphasis on human and physical processes by understanding how they operate and students gain an environmental understanding of human and physical working together.

Technical procedures of map work and fieldwork are reinforced.

 

Pupils at Kirkburton Middle School are taught:

Locational knowledge to

  • extend their locational knowledge and deepen their spatial awareness of the world’s countries using maps of the world to focus on Africa, Europe, Asia (including China and India), focusing on their environmental regions, including polar and hot deserts, key physical and human characteristics, countries and major cities

Place Knowledge to

  • understand geographical similarities, differences and links between places through the study of human and physical geography of a region within Europe, Africa, and of a region within Asia

Human and physical geography to

  • understand, through the use of detailed place-based exemplars at a variety of scales, the key processes in:
  • physical geography relating to: plate tectonics; rocks, limestone, weathering and soils; weather and climate, hydrology and coasts
  • human geography relating to: population and urbanisation; international development; economic activity in the primary, secondary, tertiary and quaternary sectors; and the use of natural resources
  • understand how human and physical processes interact to influence, and change landscapes, environments and the climate; and how human activity relies on effective functioning of natural systems.

Geographical skills and fieldwork to

  • build on their knowledge of globes, maps and atlases and apply and develop this knowledge routinely in the classroom.
  • interpret Ordnance Survey maps in the classroom, including using grid references and scale, topographical and other thematic mapping, and aerial and satellite photographs
  • use fieldwork to collect, analyse and draw conclusions from geographical data.

Fieldwork to

  • to support physical geography, practice fieldwork skills and complete decision making exercises.